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Millions of Brits are happy to tuck into out of date food, a study has found

By Published June 07, 2019
Research revealed the average adult will happily tuck into cheese 10 days after its best before, bread five days later and fish up to three days.
 
The study of 2,000 Brits found they will also cook raw meat three days past its use by date and consume butter as much as 10 days later.
 
Fruit and vegetables will be enjoyed nine days past their recommended shelf-life, while fruit juice is considered 'good' for seven extra days.
 
Despite this, the research also found that more than half of UK households (54%) still wish that fresh food lasted longer, as consciousness about food waste continues to rise. Nearly a third of UK households end up throwing away food on a weekly basis because it hasn't lasted as long as they expected. The study, conducted for Arla Cravendale, also found milk and bread are the foods being wasted more than any other, in line with the latest research from sustainability charity WRAP which found that 490 million pints of milk are wasted every year in the home - and that
around half of it is thrown away because it hasn't been used in time.  
 
Just under two thirds (61%) admitted to regularly pouring milk down the drain or chopping mouldy bits from bread because it has already gone past its best.
But in an attempt to salvage milk that has been in the fridge for a few days, two-thirds (66%) will perform a 'sniff' test, while three in 10 (30%) will have a quick sip of their milk to see if it's on the way out.
 
The research found that food wastage is a hot topic for the future of the environment - so its not surprising that two-thirds (66%) of UK households are riddled with guilt for wasting food that has gone past its best. And a half (50%) wish that they did more to help prevent this. In an attempt to prevent food being binned, more than a third (35%) shop only as they need, buying little and often, while more than a quarter (29%) buy food that has a longer shelf life.
 
But, despite continuous efforts to try and prevent food waste, just under two thirds of households (60%) admit that food going past it's best is the main reason they throw it away.  And just under half (46%) estimate that 10 percent of their household groceries get chucked every week because of this.

It also emerged more than three quarters (79%) said they hate throwing away food because it's a waste of money, while over a half (51%) agreed it's bad for the environment, and it's clear to see that more needs to be done.

Author of The Thrifty Cookbook, and campaigner against food waste, Kate Colquhoun says:

"Food waste is still a barely discussed part of the environmental jigsaw, yet the cost to our purses and our world is vast. There are so many small practical things we can do to minimise the amount we each chuck out."

How many days or weeks Brits will eat foods/drinks out of date:


Cheese - 10 days
Milk - 3 days
Bread - 5 days
Butter - 10 days
Eggs - 8 days
Yoghurt - 5 days
Vegetables/fruit - 9 days
Fruit juice - 7 days
Raw meat - 3 days
Cooked meat - 4 days
Fish - 3 days
Sweets - 12 weeks
Chocolate - 11 weeks
Crips - 10 weeks
Cured meat - 4 weeks
Cereal - 10 weeks
Biscuits - 9 weeks
Soft/fizzy drinks - 11 weeks
Dried herbs and spices - 14 weeks
Tinned food - 13 weeks
Dried fruit - 12 weeks
Dipping sauces - 10 weeks
Read 40 times Last modified on Friday, 07 June 2019 07:33
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